New this summer! The Festival at Ochre Pit Cove

Layout 1It’s almost summer! Breakwater Books and House of Anansi are pairing up to celebrate June in high-style. Presenting The Festival at Ochre Pit Cove, A Weekend of Newfoundland Music, Books, and ArtSituated in the beautiful North Shore community and featuring some of Newfoundland’s best-known authors, this may just be the most easterly literary festival in the western hemisphere.

Music, readings, and a pop-up gallery featuring local artists’ work — all events take place at The Church at Ochre Pit Cove.

With readings by Michael Crummey, Lisa Moore, Chad Pelley, and Claire Wilkshire. Music by What Odds and The Blue Drop (Holly Hogan & Allan Byrne).

All events $10/each; Weekend Pass $15. Advance Tickets available in St. John’s at The Travel Bug on Water Street, and in Smallpoint at the Smallpoint General Store.

Full details available at thefestivalatochrepitcove.com.

Shoulder to Shoulder at the Ship! Breakwater’s Spring Lit Party packs ’em in….

Here’s a quick photo gallery from our Spring Literary Party, last Thursday (April 11, 2013) at the Ship in St. John’s. We rang in the new season with new books by Claire Wilkshire and Chad Pelley, music by Pilot to Bombardier and Katie Baggs,  book-cookie loot bags, and the finest crowd you ever did see…

20130411_203844 custom cookie swag 189 192 205 206 211 231

Blue Lagoon Book List: What Books Can Our Authors Not Live Without?

Seen all those Ideal Bookshelf and Desert Island Bookshelf lists floating about these days? Us, too. So we got to thinking, which must-have books would Breakwater authors most want to be stranded with?

Image

Claire Wilkshire, author of the forthcoming debut novel, Maxine:

Virginia Woolf Mrs. Dalloway

T.S. Eliot Collected Poems 1909-1962 

Leon Rooke Who Do You Love

John Metcalf Adult Entertainment

Richard Ford Independence Day

John Le Carré Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

Terry Pratchett Reaper Man


+ A really good, fat dictionary like my Webster’s New Encyclopedic Dictionary.  I think it cost $15 at Coles: best bargain ever.  I keep it by the bed so I can use it for the cryptic crosswords in the Globe.

…. (I can’t start putting Newfoundland novels on this list because I wouldn’t be able to stop.)

Image

Joan Sullivan, author of In the Field: 

I don’t have much of a library at home, as I tend to pass along books (I just don’t like “stuff”). But those I have include:
1. The Mandarins, by Simone de Beauvoir. What befalls a group of French intellectuals immediately following WWII. Characters based on de Beauvoir, Sartre, Camus. It is political and sensual and dramatic. When I first read it, I was younger than the main character’s daughter. Every five years or so I re-read it, and now I am older than the main character.
2. A book of Shakespeare’s Tragedies that belonged to my grandmother, Rose Hoskins. She died when I was six months old.
3. All of Lisa Moore’s stories and novels. She is my friend and I love her writing.
4. Something new from the library. Might be the latest Rankin or a writer I’ve found like Ann Packer or Steve Yarbrough.
5. Jane Austen, no explanation needed.
6. A young adult book/autobiography called We Shook the Family Tree by Hildegarde Dolson, a book I read in Grade 6 or 7 and loved and never forgot. My daughter found it for me on Amazon. Speaking of young adult novels, my daughter has a flourishing library and I constantly borrow from it, The Perks of Being a Wildflower, Rob Lowe’s Stories I Only Tell My Friends (excellent read, by the way), The Book Thief …

Calvin Evans, author of Silk Sails: Women of Newfoundland and Their Ships and coming Spring 2013, Master Shipbuilders of Newfoundland and Labrador:

I guess my favorite books fall into two categories, as might be expected with my dual professions:, so here goes:

Simone Weil     The Need for Roots

John R. W. Stott      Basic Christianity

John Oman     Grace and Personality

C. S. Lewis     Mere Christianity

Oscar Williams, ed.     Immortal Poems of the English Language

Alister McGrath                    Passion for Truth

**and**

D. W. Prowse     History of Newfoundland

Dictionary of Newfoundland English

Gordon Handcock    The Story of Trinity

Capt. Allan Villiers    Men, Ships and the Sea

E. R. Seary    Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland

William Christian and Sheila Grant    The George Grant Reader

AlmostHomeCVR-72dpi-WEBSmall

… and from Jennifer Morgan, artist, children’s author and illustrator of Almost Home: The Sinking of the SS Caribou:

Okay, I couldn’t resist this excuse to not work!

Oxford’s Dictionary of English
National Geographic World Atlas
The Bible
Shakespeare’s Collected Works
Harold Bloom’s The Invention of the Human
One empty book
Edible Plants for the region where I’m marooned
A book of matches
And…since I will not have any excuse not to read it:
James Joyce’s Ulysses
and (why not?) Homer’s Ulysses also.

Our Writers Resolve: A Handful of Breakwater Authors Give Us Their Top New Year’s Resolutions for 2013

Look who’s back in action! If you’re reading this, then congratulations! You survived the Mayan-End-Of-Days crisis AND your NYE Hangover. We’re back in full-gear here at Breakwater headquarters and first on our list was a list… of resolutions. We asked a handful of Breakwater’s authors to give us their top resolutions for 2013, literary or otherwise, and here’s what they said:

Kerri Cull, author of 2012’s Soak and curator at The Book Fridge:

My literary resolution: to complete drafting a manuscript of short fiction that is currently 24 stories deep.

Debbie Hanlon, author of two Adventures of Gus and Isaac books, including 2012’s Ho Ho No Christmas!:

2013 will be a year of the Deb! Looking forward to getting my red belt in TKD, completing Trouble times in Tickle Harbour, the 3rd book in The Adventures of Gus and Isaac series, spending as much time as I can with my amazing husband, traveling, and taking good care of myself and my loved ones..all in all continuing to love and live my amazing life!

Susan M. MacDonald, author of Edge of Time, winner of the 2012 Moonbeam Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy:

I’ve got to stop sitting in front of the computer and get up and MOVE. Of course, I’ve got to spend more time at the computer, WRITING, too.

Ergh, I hate New Years resolutions.

Samuel Thomas Martin, author of 2012’s A Blessed Snarl

My two aims this year are to finish my novel Odin’s Eyes and, since I’m living in Iowa, have tea with Marilynne Robinson. Both, at this point seem equally as (un)likely.

Trudy J. Morgan-Cole, author of By the Rivers of Brooklyn and the 2012 NL Heritage and History Award winner, That Forgetful Shore:

I just posted a vlog all about my writerly New Year’s resolutions so it’s fresh in my mind … I have a few things in mind but the main one is to finish researching and writing this draft of my current work-in-progress, “A Sudden Sun Discloses,” which is (partly, at least) about suffragists in 1890s and 1920s Newfoundland.

Chad Pelley, author of 2010’s award-winning debut novel, Away From Everywhere and the forthcoming novel, Every Little Thingto be released in March 2013:

For me, 2013 is going to go down as The Year of Ambitious Writing. I have two goals. One is to curate a collection of shorts by March, from the 27 stories on my hard drive. There’s at least a dozen there that’ll work well together: funny ones, sad ones, funny-sad ones, about people longing for something they’ll never have. It’ll be called Big Red Hearts. Come February, I’ve cleared my schedule of everything – day jobs included – to write the novel I’ve been preparing to write for years now. It’s about a small town forced to turn on each other, with subplots and backstory including a man’s divorce and search for his missing daughter. I’ve never been more excited about a writing project, and the first draft will exist by 2014.

Claire Wilkshire, author of the forthcoming debut novel, Maxine

1. Smile more.  (Less scowly-frowniness, even if it’s just from concentrating.)

2. Encourage people.  (Do we think “Good old X, he really taught me a lot that time when he accurately pointed out every one of my shortcomings?” No, we do not.)
3. Be optimistic.

These appear in blue marker on a yellow, star-shaped sticky note on my computer stand. There’s also the small matter of the 20 lbs. but in order to remain optimistic, I decided to leave that one off the note.

***